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My next big thing

Damn it, that Guerrier chap tagged me in a writers Q&A meme and I’m bound to follow suit or my entrails will be forfeit to Lord Beelzebub and his horde of demonic kittenbats. (Also, it will help prevent me writing a 10,000 word screed on the unbelievable corporate fuckwittery that is the Hellblazer cancellation.) Since Guerrier, and Joseph Lidster before him, have gone off-piste I am going to do the same. I DO have a new novel in the works but I’m not willing to talk about it yet, so I’m going to talk about a new book I’m contributing a short story to. What is the title of your new book?  My story ‘Grit’ is appearing in A Town Called Pandemonium, which comes out at the end of the month. Where did the idea come from for the book? A commission. Anne Perry and Jared Shurin asked me if I wanted to come play in their shared universe along with nine other authors, and I said yes please. Oddly, they’d asked me to contribute a Dickens/London themed tale to a previous anthology, and as a Dickens fan and a London resident, I leapt at the chance and then… came up with nothing. Eventually I recused myself. They then said, how about a western? And I had a story within ten minutes, as if delivered by the ideas fairy. Odd how it happens sometimes. The germ of the idea was a man waking up naked in the main street of a frontier town. How did he get there and what will he do next? What genre does your book fall under?...

Pandemonium

Those lovely people at Pornokitsch, Anne and Jared – I call them The Pornos; they don’t laugh – have set up an imprint called Pandemonium Fiction to publish short story collections. The first, Stories of the Apocalypse,  contains original tales  inspired by the art of John Martin, and the book will be released in October 2011 to coincide with the Tate Gallery’s new exhibition of his work.  As well as stories by people like Jon Courtenay Grimwood, Lauren Beukes and Sophia McDougall it contains ‘A Private Viewing’, the first outright horror tale I’ve written. “I don’t really think I believe in redemption. Punishment, consequences, responsibility; these things I understand. It’s how I was raised, I suppose. Reformation and rehabilitation, though, baffle me. It surely can’t be enough to just say sorry for the bad things you’ve done. And anyway, how can you prove you mean those apologies, that you’re not just saying whatever the world wants to hear? Why should those of us who work hard, keep our heads down, treat our neighbours with respect and consideration, be nice to those who aren’t nice in turn? Doesn’t seem fair. So no, I don’t believe in redemption. I believe in justice. Which explains, as far as anything can, why I did what I did…” I’ll let you know when it goes on sale – eBook only, but in all formats –  so you can find out exactly what my ‘hero’ did, and why it may turn out to have been a very, very bad idea indeed. Meanwhile, here’s the stunning trailer for the Tate...